Birds adapt to new habitats created by sand and gravel extraction

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Little ringed plover (c) Tomasz Wilk
Little ringed plover (c) Tomasz Wilk

With minimal extra care by the operators, many bird species can profit from the activities of mineral extraction and the novel habitats created at sand and gravel pits.

new partnership project will improve the habitats for breeding birds at three mining sites in Southern Poland. Conservationists hope to boost the regional populations of several rare species.

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2014 in review for this blog

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DSCN6464I’d like to share the 2014 annual report for this blog, proposed by WordPress. I take the opportunity to wish you all a healthy and rich 2015 and to thank you all for your followership, readership and contributions! Let’s restore more in 2015!

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 8,000 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 7 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

 

What’s on the menu: a beetle, a cricket or a bug?

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shrike with foodIn three years the largest limestone quarry in the Netherlands, operated by the ENCI cement plant near Maastricht, will be closed. Large area of Mount St. Peter is already being transformed into an area for nature, biodiversity, ecosystem services and other public benefits. Can we expect red-backed shrikes to appear in the area, as an indicator of a functioning ecosystem? Read the rest of this entry »

Have you booked your tickets to Manchester yet?

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ser2015 The 2015 Society for Ecological Restoration World Conference will take place in Manchester, UK from 23rd to 27th of August 2015. The Conference theme is Towards Resilient Ecosystems: Restoring the Urban, the Rural and the Wild.

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Restoration of Lake Sagsjön continues (in pictures)

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Brown Hawker Aeshna grandis
Brown Hawker Aeshna grandis

A picture report following up on our earlier story on the restoration of the Swedish Lake Sagsjön . A lot has been done at the lake, but not all planned work has been completed yet.

As one can expect when working with nature, many problems have arisen but most of them have been solved. But one thing that is not so easy to solve is the unusually high water level that has not allowed us to remove all the shrubs and trees as planned.

Work will continue when the lake freezes in the winter.

 

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Ecological restoration begins at ground level

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Functional geomorphologic design is the basis for successful restoration

This post was kindly prepared by Sara Peláez Sánchez

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe question whether to continue mining for resources or not is not on the agenda today. The important questions about mining are different: How do we maximize resource efficiency in order to use fewer materials for longer?

And the question relevant to this blog is: How do we improve the quality of mine reclamation, so that society and the planet get the best ecological outcome as part of the deal?

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Restoration of floodplain habitats increases recreational value of the Tovačov Lakes

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DSCN4149Birdwatchers in Central Moravia (the Czech Republic) can add to their  favourite patch a brand new cosy birding hide, just in time for the coming winter season. Late autumn and winter are the best times to watch migratory waterfowl at the Tovačov Lakes, cluster of gravel pits operated by Českomoravský štěrk (HeidelbergCement in CZ).

The wooden construction was designed jointly by the company and the Czech Society for Ornithology (BirdLife Partner in the Czech Republic). It was opened for visitors on 5th of October, as part of the EuroBirdwatch event.

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